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Nemicolopterus crypticus by jconway Nemicolopterus crypticus by jconway
Aw, what a tweet liddle tweedy bird! I want to snuglylumphs it all up!

The superb little pterosaur Nemicolopterus crypticus, in the trees, like all the restorations out there (hey, at least I went for something other than a ginko!).

Based on my skeletal => [link]
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:iconfredthedinosaurman:
FredtheDinosaurman Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2014  Student General Artist
Super cute. I would love to have a Nemicolopterus as a pet, but only if they had this color scheme. You're amazing Mr. Conway, your pterosaurs are the best :clap:
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:iconkidsapiens:
KidSapiens Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2013
Awwww~!
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:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Absolutely amazing!
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:iconqueenofdragons2:
Queenofdragons2 Featured By Owner May 12, 2013
...Wow, it's cute.
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:iconninjamonkey38:
NinjaMonkey38 Featured By Owner May 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Gyaaah~! They are SO CUTE! *explodes* :iconmyfeelzplz::iconmonkeyloveplz::iconyuiheavenplz::iconomgsocuteplz::icondragonwant::iconawwwplz: I just HAVE to fave this!
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Student General Artist
Very cool.
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:iconforkhead12:
forkhead12 Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2013
And they said only small feathered dinosaurs could be cute.
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:iconnutcase9:
Nutcase9 Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2011  Student General Artist
Dawww
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:iconsorantheman:
Sorantheman Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2011
TVtropes brought me here. :)
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:iconnutcase9:
Nutcase9 Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2011  Student General Artist
Me too!
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:iconninjamonkey38:
NinjaMonkey38 Featured By Owner May 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Me three! :iconsmile-luplz:
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:icongoogleplex6:
Googleplex6 Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2010
terrific! I love their colors!
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:iconrixshaw:
Rixshaw Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2010  Professional General Artist
Lovely interpretation.
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:iconliliensternus:
liliensternus Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2010
Love the scenery,

Made a sketch of Nemicolopterus once, intended to do a painting, ah well for some other age
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:iconlittlefoxstudio:
LittleFoxStudio Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
How big are they?
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:iconapricotpesilent:
apricotpesilent Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2008
Freaking adorable. Has to be one of my favourite pterosaurs, and you've done a splendid job of animating these two. :]
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:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is what I get for slacking on my DA-checking for a few months... miss beauties like this.

Really cool. These type of images are why I get excited about new species of 'little' paleo-critters. It's really a whole type of animal/ecosystem (leafy surroundings, small arboreal animals) that you don't see much in palaeontography.
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner May 1, 2008
I should have put some insects in...
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:iconpost-sapient:
post-sapient Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2008
beautiful. They look like reptilian fruit bats :D
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:icontehfuzzyduck:
TehFuzzyDuck Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2008
Simply gorgeous. This is such a delicate, lovely scene. So vivid.
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:icongreensprite:
GreenSprite Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008  Professional Digital Artist
Gosh, they really ARE cute! How big would these guys be?

(funny, I read your comment on how they're not dinosaurs, wonder what is considered a dinosaur in fact, go to wikipedia, and end up on the talk page reading your comments :D)
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008
Really pretty small - [link] should give you an idea.
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:iconjoshuadunlop:
JoshuaDunlop Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008  Professional Digital Artist
i love the colours and the overall design
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:icondunwich7:
dunwich7 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
Amazing how you brought them to life. This is really the first time ever that I've thought of a "real" dinosaur as "cute".

:clap:
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
Ha, not a dinosaur, remember! But thanks.
Reply
:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
Man, you've got to send this to the photo library... yes...
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:iconfingertier:
Fingertier Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
So cute!
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:icongorgosaurus:
Gorgosaurus Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
Interesting and inspiring.

Spike.
Reply
:iconsphenacodon:
Sphenacodon Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2008
Magnificent. Are the colors based on fruitbats?
This picture epitomizes just how much more we know about pterosaurs than we did some fifty years back. Compare these small, colorful, furry, and - yes - cuddly animals to the enormous, snaggletoothed, leathery rhamphorhynchoid pterosaurs in yesteryear's paleo-books...
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
Naw, I just made up the colours!

It's interesting that you should say that, because I think in some ways we're still going around in circles. Have you seen Manfred Reichel's drawings of Rhamphorhynchus? They're from the forties (I think), and I'd pit them against my stuff any day. Completely awesome.

I'll email you one.
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:iconsphenacodon:
Sphenacodon Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008
Hmm, intriguing. Of course, some art is more equal than other art - I've seen some drawings of Rhamphorhynchus that are more dragon than pterosaur. I'd like to see those drawings.
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:iconcentauran:
Centauran Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
I do like them, really I do ... but I'm not sure about the tree. Well, I suppose the tree itself is okay, but the red berries worry me, because the only reason berries are red is to entice the birds, and it just seems a bit early, like ...
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
The tree's a Podocarpus, which are known as far back as the Jurassic, so I think I'm on fairly safe ground. The berries might be red to attract other animals - pterosaurs for a start!
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:iconcentauran:
Centauran Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Hmmmm - now you're clutching at straws, because the last I heard, pterosaurs were carnivorous! Trees don't just grow berries either; they're the fruits of fertilised flowers, which I believe didn't come along until after the 'dinosaurs' had all gone. However, who cares - it's all going to be gone in a hundred years or so, anyway!
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2009  Student Writer
"because the last I heard, pterosaurs were carnivorous"

I don't know where did you got that from, but, if it says that they were all seabird analogues, then its obviously extremely outdated
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:iconcentauran:
Centauran Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I realise that our knowledge of prehistory is advancing all the time, but the fact still remains that there is no evidence that pterosaurs were anything but carnivorous.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2009  Student Writer
Well, tapejarids interesting adaptations like the fact the shoulder join has moved downwards, and short wings. These, plus the short beak quite unlikely that of most pterosaurs, clearly portrays an animal that wasn't an oceanic soarer, let alone a skimmer (indeed, no known pterosaur was a skimmer, and the clade to which tapejaridae belonged to also included the strongly terrestrial azhdarchids), but a terrestrial form, that spent most time on the ground.

In addition, tapejarids had strong claws, which suggest they were good climbers. Being tree climbers, its possible they ate fruit as well as small animals, and likely they search up and down the trees like some galliformes do today.
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:iconcentauran:
Centauran Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I think it highly likely - I believe we all too easily fall into the trap of assuming that 'early forms of life' were necessarily primitive experiments - nature just doesn't work like that, and we're only now waking up to the 'fact' that most 'dinosaurs' weren't great, stupid, lumbering things, but in fact, superbly tailored to there own particular niches, just as are animals today. We'll never know the whole truth, unfortunately - I don't think we have the time left to figure it out anyway - we're about to leave our own set of fossils.
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
I'm sorry, I don't know you well enough to tell, but you are joking aren't you?
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:iconcentauran:
Centauran Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Possibly about the berries, but not the rest of it.
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
Okay, well then...

Pterosaurs are not considered to be universally carnivorous, some are thought to have been frugivorous: [link] [link] , and I see no reason that Nemicolopterus wouldn't have eaten "berries".

The "berries" here don't belong to a flowering plant, they are on Podocarpus, a genus of conifer. The fleshy fruit of Podocarpus is edible, but is in fact a seed cone, not a fruit per se. Podocarpus is known from Jurassic sediments and the podocarpaceae from Middle Jurassic [link] considerably older than Nemicolopterus, and is still alive today -- meaning it was around when Nemi was.

Not that it's actually relevant here, but angiosperms (flowering plants) are known to have gone back to the Early Cretaceous at least, and possibly to the Jurassic -- this is well known, but I'll find the necessary primary literature if you want it.

I'm not sure what you mean by "it's all going to be gone in a hundred years or so, anyway" -- a lot of our writing will still be around.
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:iconcentauran:
Centauran Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
I should have known better than to comment in the first place, and if we're going to agree on 'seed cone', then I'm happy with that! (I thought the first angios were about 140 m y ago?)

As to the '100 years' reference, at the current rate of increase of warming, population growth, atmospheric pollution and resource depletion, we'll almost certainly have rendered this planet uninhabitable by then. We are heading pell-mell towards extinction - one Australian scientist had the balls to say only this week, that our recent final recognition of the problem may 'already be too late'. Nobody has yet pointed out that we must reduce CO2 levels, not merely cut the rate of increase - that is futile. No-one has yet suggested that we start culling the human population, instead of increasing it, which we are currently doing at the rate of 8,000 an hour, or 77 million a year - watch for that one. I am very glad I wasn't born yesterday, because there is no shining future for today's chidren - it's going to get very nasty, very soon. There are still (and always) those who pooh-pooh the data and predictions, but the mere fact that politicians around the world now suddenly agree that 'we have a problem' should be sending shivers up our collective spine. We totally ignore the fact that all of life is interconnected; that we depend upon the tundra to breed the mosquitos that feed the birds that pollinate the plants, etc etc. Some of our writings may survive for a while, but there's not going to anyone to read them. Doom and gloom? Sit back and watch!
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008
Yeah, well I think you're doom-and-glooming it up a bit much (well, a lot much). We've got problems, to be sure, but we can't assume we won't solve a lot of those problems. On the population issue, what I've seen suggests that fecundity is decreasing, and that we can expect to see population peak at around 8-10 billion in 2050-2060 or so [link] . That doesn't seem to be an insurmountable problem -- it's hardly culling time!
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(1 Reply)
:iconameru:
ameru Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2008  Student General Artist
oh my gosh this is the cutest EVER. It's like they're eating Taxus berries or something <3 so cute
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2008
wow! Can I favorite this one twice?
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
Yeah, three or four times even!
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Cute little buggers :D
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2008
So I guess you want to snuglylumphs them too huh?
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I settle for just watching... :)
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2008
Kinky.
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